Posts

SIGCSE TS 2021 Reflection

 The SIGCSE Technical Symposium 2021 happened! So that means it’s time for a conference reflection. However, this blog post is going to be a little different. I’m going to try writing a letter to my future self focusing on how the conference went and how I can do online conferences better in the future. [Also posted on  medium .] Dear Future Self, So you are planning to attend another online conference. And I know there are online conferences in your future because you got a paper accepted to ITiCSE . And then ICER and Grace Hopper are both online (Wow, writing that makes me realize that we attend more conferences than I thought.). You’ve done a few online conferences now, so it’s time to remember what happened last time and learn the lessons from them. We don’t want to repeat the “I’m up to my eyeballs in work!” experience. Especially considering we wrote an entire blog post about attending two conferences at once, ICER and Learning@Scale (are we going to Learning@Scale this year?

Spring 2021 Theme

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As I said in an earlier post, I’ve decided to forgo new year’s resolutions this year and try The Theme System from CGP Grey and Myke Hurley . You can get an overview from CGP Grey’s video . This post is to discuss my theme and a quantified self deep dive. The deep dive is into some of my personal data as my first steps toward my theme. [Also posted on  medium .] Theme: Being Well-Rested My semester’s theme is “Being Well-Rested.” Despite being long, this theme resonates with me and has a bunch of stuff behind it. So bear with me. The biggest thing impacting this semester is this spring semester is going to be rough. It is my first time teaching entirely online from start to finish because I was on parental leave last fall. Technically I taught online when Covid-19 hit us mid-Spring 2020, but while I did work right up to my baby’s birth, I wasn’t the main person running things for most of the online part of Spring 2020. I made decisions on the transition, finished the teaching materia

New Resolu... Theme! And organization

As the year draws to a close, it's that time of year to start thinking about new year resolutions. So I thought I'd write a quick post on what I'm currently contemplating about what I plan to do in hopes that it'll help others by raising awareness of an example of how to think of this. [Also posted on  medium .] First, I just discovered The Theme System  through a recent CGP Grey video . He created it with Myke Hurley , and they discuss it on their podcast Cortex , which I also just started listening to. My new year resolutions have been really stagnant the past few years, where I recycle them and mostly succeed at them. And yes, I know most research says people fail at new year resolutions, but I'm on the opposite side in the sense I pick ones that I know I can achieve. However, I've been reusing them the last few years out of fear if I don't make them my resolutions, I won't do them, and I want those things in my life. The Theme System , in short, is

How I Run The Head Teaching Staff Meeting For My 200+ Student Class

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This is also posted on medium . This is the last post of a 5 blog post series on how I organize the teaching staff for my 200+ student class. This post discusses how I run my weekly meeting with my head staff. The head staff is a subgroup of my teaching staff that helps me organize all the others. In this post, I discuss how I split the meeting into two phases to allow some head staff to leave when talking about topics that are not relevant to their responsibilities. I also include a discussion on what I do between meetings because that is just as important as what happens during. The other posts in this series are as follows (I’ll update with links as I post): Overview Teaching staff roles How I communicate with my teaching staff How I track the to-do list How I run the head staff meetings (You are here) Terminology Rather than require you to read my teaching staff roles post , here is a quick refresher: Teaching Associate (TA+)  — A full-time department staff member (not a student) a

How I Track The To-do List For My 200+ Student Class

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This is also  posted on medium . This is post #4 of a 5 post series on how I organize the teaching staff for my 200+ student class. This post discusses how I track all the class’s tasks. I start with an overview of Trello , the tool I use to track tasks. Next is a discussion on my overall task management approach. I then move on to how I use Trello to structure the task lists, common and recurring tasks, and a task’s life cycle. Finally, I close with the advantages I see for having an externalized task list. The other posts in this series are as follows (I’ll update with links as I post): Overview Teaching staff roles How I communicate with my teaching staff How I track the to-do list (You are here) How I run the head staff meetings Terminology Rather than require you to read my teaching staff roles post , here is a quick refresher: Teaching Associate (TA+)  — A full-time department staff member (not a student) assigned to my class. She serves as my right-hand person with many and var

How I Communicate With My Teaching Staff For My 200+ Student Class

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This is also  posted on medium . This is post #3 of a 5 post series on how I organize the teaching staff for my 200+ student class. This post discusses how I communicate with my teaching staff. I first go over how the semester starts because part of communication is setting the tone for the semester. Then I spend the rest of the post discussing how I center all of my communication in Slack , a chat tool that enables organizing conversations through channels. I discuss who is in which channel, how I use Slack integrations, my Slack philosophy, and Slack etiquette. The other posts in this series are as follows (I’ll update with links as I post): Overview Teaching staff roles How I communicate with my teaching staff (You are here) How I track the to-do list How I run the head staff meetings Terminology Rather than require you to read my teaching staff roles post , here is a quick refresher: Teaching Associate (TA+) — A full-time department staff member (not a student) assigned to my class

The Teaching Staff Roles For My 200+ Student Class

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This is also posted on medium . This is post #2 of a 5 post series on how I organize the teaching staff for my 200+ student class. I have seven different roles in my teaching staff organized into a three-layered hierarchy. This post drills down into each teaching staff’s role by outlining their tasks and responsibilities. I close with some general thoughts. The other posts in this series are as follows (I’ll update with links as I post): Overview Teaching staff roles (You are here) How I communicate with my teaching staff How I track the to-do list How I run the head staff meetings Here’s the organization chart from the overview post again as a reminder of all the TA roles. My TA+ is a full-time staff member of the department (not a student) assigned to my class. The TAs are graduate students. UTAs are undergraduate students. Most UTAs teach a lab in pairs with about 25 students per lab. One section of the course includes one lab and two lectures per week. If I have multiple lecture se